How long for muscle recovery from Deadlifting and what to do to aid muscle recovery?

How long for muscle recovery from Deadlifting and what to do to aid muscle recovery?

There is no optimal time for recovery, exactly. Studies show that the 72-hour recovery method maybe followed when total recovery may be reached, before exercising the same muscle groups again. Each individual or each athlete may differ. This is also depending on their daily nutrition that is consumed for recovery as well as their rest for recovery after a training day, or a training session. Training goal, intensity and load may also dictate how fast one may recover.

Generally, it is recommended that a high protein diet, adequate hydration, and 7-9 hours’ sleep cycle, should be followed to speed up recovery. Powernaps may also assist, where possible, during one’s wake hours.

Dynamic stretching, done before training, and static stretching after done after training, as well as hot and / or cold therapy, and foam rolling will all also speed up and aid in your recovery from deadlifts. Dynamic stretching maybe done in a low intensity form of cardio (3 – 15 mins).

Some cool down static stretches after a deadlift training session:

Downward facing dog: This stretch targets your lower back, hips, and hamstrings, all of which may be sore after doing deadlifts.

Cat cow: This active stretch can help to loosen sore muscles in your lower back.

Forward fold: This stretch targets your lower back and hamstrings. Listen to your body and do not push yourself too far. Bend your knees during the stretch if necessary.

Legs on the wall: By lying on your back with your legs raised against the wall relieves pressure on your lower back, stretches the hamstrings and helps to increase blood flow to your legs.

Getting a massage or using a foam roller on your sore muscles after workouts (more specifically 24 – 48 hours after workout) can help with recovery. This helps to improve circulation to the damaged muscles, relieves tension and releases knots in your muscles.

The foam roller can be used to roll out your hamstrings and calves. Below are the steps to follow to get this done successfully:

Sit on the floor and place the foam roller horizontally under one calf or hamstring.

Lift your hips off the ground with your hands.

Roll the foam roller up and down your calf or hamstring.

Repeat on the other leg.

You can also use the foam roller to roll out your IT band to loosen your hips.

Lie down on your side with the foam roller just under your hip bone and your bottom leg straight.

Bend your top leg and place your foot on the floor in front of your bottom leg.

Plant both hands on the ground and roll the outside of your leg from knee to hip, avoiding the joints themselves.

Post-workout rest and recovery:

Recovery from deadlifts starts right after your workout ends. It is most important to refuel and re-hydrate, to give your body what it needs to build and repair the muscles. Have a snack that includes both carbohydrates and protein within 30 to 45 minutes after your workout. Other nutrition that aids in decreasing inflammation of the muscles, and aids in speeding up recovery are fruits, and leafy green vegetables.

Many of the hormones that your body needs to recover, including testosterone and growth hormones, are produced during REM sleep. This is the stage of sleep when your muscles are relaxed. So be sure to get plenty of rest.

You also want to take a break between workouts. Take at least one day of rest after doing deadlifts before returning to the gym to do them again. This does not necessarily mean you cannot exercise, just that you want to rest the muscles you previously targeted with deadlifts. If you want to do a workout the day after deadlifts, consider the upper body, or the front kinetic chain of muscles.

Soothe the sore muscles:

Delayed-onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, is normal after a tough workout. This type of soreness starts a day or two after your workout and then slowly dissipates. Slowly increasing the intensity of your workouts over a long period of time (weeks or months) may help decrease DOMS symptoms.

Use heat and cold therapy to soothe your sore muscles. The heat from a heating pad, sauna, or hot tub, can help relax muscles and increase your circulation, which allows your body to deliver nutrients to your healing muscles as well as removes metabolic wastes, at a more rapid rate.

Alternatively, try applying a cold or ice pack to your sore muscles. While this does not feel as soothing as the heat, it helps to cool your core (core temperature) after a workout and reduces swelling in the muscles. The ice also increases blood flow to the area, which promotes healing.

References:

https://barbend.com/deadlift-history/
https://catalystgym.com/the-deadlift-a-gritty-history/
https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/deadlift-muscles-worked#takeaway
https://www.stylist.co.uk/fitness-health/weightlifting-what-muscles-do-deadlifts-work-weight-training-lifting-weights/332966
https://www.onnit.com/academy/5-keys-mastering-deadlift/
https://www.livestrong.com/article/552383-recovery-from-deadlifts/

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